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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN2 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but springfield was a city where people who couldn't get a job in boston, couldn't get a job in new york would come to springfield, a city of about 170,000. and everybody was either irish, italian or they were french- canadian. and it was important to them to know where you came from. i said, well, i came from senegal valley. what? [laughter] but that was an education, just being in springfield. and this country is, it's about the, it is the great meeting place of people from all over the world. and somehow they get here, and they're free. it's -- and once, well, it's a fantastic accomplishment. i started to say america's a wonderful country, but it's -- [inaudible] >> there are some, of course, they probably don't know what they're talking about, but there are some that criticize some of your books that some of the characters are one-dimensional or simplistic or play to stereotypes. >> i think that with pride. so would dickens. [laughter] try to find some complicateed side of the great lawyer in -- [inaudible] i'll send you a postcard, the name are come to me. the name will come to me. i brus
met a guy at yellowstone who worked for the public tv station in boston, retired from that job and had always wanted to be a park ranger. key couldn't beat out how to get there so we joined a student conservation association and ginger program. there wasn't anyone in his class over the age of 19. i met a woman in denver whose daughter had gone through teach for america and as she watched her daughter teach in a los angeles classroom she was so moved that she applied for teach for america herself. she was in her early 50's at the time and ended up a year later in a dorm room in july in houston at 115 degrees, sweltering temperature sharing a bathroom down the hall with three, 22-year-olds. it seem like whether they were burrowing up from the street or repelling down from the ceiling or sneaking in the side door there were more and more people who were trying to find these kind of pathways to purpose. we created at encore.org a fellowship, an encore fellowship program which was designed to be a front door for many people who wanted to make this passage. it started in silicon valley with
in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues facing the commission as a year and. tonight at eight eastern on c-span2. >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contests across the country. we will have coverage a president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeches from candidates, plus your reaction of the election results throughout the night by phone, imo, facebook and twitter. live coverage begins tomorrow night at eight eastern on c-span, c-span radio in c-span.org. >> a look now at some other house races. we recently interviewed nathan gonzales,
is in chicago, and mitt romney in boston. we'll focus on the more competitive senate seats and taking reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter with live coverage beginning at eight eastern on c-span c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> when i watch c-span, i like the morning journal, the give and take there, the balanced approach, and i also like to hear the callers. never called myself, but i like hearing the callers. some of them are unusual to say the least, others thought provoking. c-span is everywhere. in washington, every event, you know, small hearings, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watching c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >>> up next, former presidential candidate ralph nader on his book "17 solutions: bold ideas for america's future" looking at the political and cosh -- landscape and issues facing the country. the independent candidate for president in 2004 and 2008 discusses tax reform, the reduction of the
in boston. plus key house and senate victory concession speeches across the country. throughout the night, your reaction by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter. live coverage starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. now a debate for the u.s. senate senate in wyoming between senator john, democratic challenger. and joe. the debate courtesy of wyoming pbs. it's about an hour. >> moderator: first candidate is going to be a joe otto. give me a moment. there's a complication. he's lives -- open the family ranch. he worked as a design engineer and was active in the republican and libertarian parties before joining the country party. our democratic party candidate tim chest nut he is worked extension lively as a professional photographer and as a staff member of our regional services which provides assistance to go only disabled. and the republican party candidate is senator john. he's a physician and a former president of the wyoming medical society. he was opponented to the u.s. senate in 2011, and re-elected to that post in 2008. he is a member of several senate c
here. >> hike in the stephen flynn from northeastern university in boston. on the issue of new normal, i wonder picking up on david's point about the price to post-9/11, is the sort of coming to grips with the hubris we could prevent bad things from happening, this huge investment in the post-secular world arabic ere we could ideally stop risk. actually coping with that is what we really need to increase and maybe just bring it very close to home. we just had this bashing mother nature in the area, priced at around $60 billion for a risk above the basic things like when you have tunnels that are only seven feet above water. it fills up the hole and you end up with 86 million gallons of oil in the tunnel and that's not hard to predict. putting safeguards in place in recovering this may be one element of this. basically the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election t
called him -- [inaudible] now i love boston, and i went to school up there and high school there's a lot of smart people thereupon. i resented the fact that people in the north think that people in texas are deserving of terms like -- i don't know about you it kind of upsets me. because we do have people that, you know, are a little, you know, capable of doings things including the then president of the united states lyndon johnson. in a six week period kept the kennedy team because it was essential to be able to keep the momentum going on the agenda that stalled for three years, effectively. he kept the kennedy team which showed the leadership skills of humility. he the leadership skill of dogged determination to create and he the skills of creating a strategy. he implement ploymented in a six-week period a 25% across the board cut in income tabses. the idea was to cut taxes to raise revenue to going fund the great society programs. he went to the senate, which was oppose to the ultimately goal of, you know, significance civil rights legislation and convinced the dean of the senate, who
-- [inaudible] i love boston there a lot of smart people there. i resented the fact that people in the north think that people in texas are disperving of terms like -- [inaudible] i know about you but it upsets me. we have people that are a little capable of doing things including the then president of the united states lyndon johnson. in a six-week period kept the kennedy team because it was a essential to be able to keep the momentum going on the agenda that had stalled for three years effectively. he kept the kennedy team which showed the leadership kills humility. he the leadership skill of dogged determination to create and he had the skill of creating a strategy and implemented in aics-week period a 125% across the board cut in tax rates. believe it or not as a liberal democrat the idea was to cut taxes to raise rev now fund the great society program. he went to the senate, which was opposed to the ultimately goal of, you know, significant in the legislation and convince the dean of the senate, who was the budget chair that he would commit to a tbhawment year to year a decrees. not lik
takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still out c. davis is the author on "in depth" on booktv on c-span 2. a better after we have with some questions have been preapproval shape as now. we have an hour and half program. we'll be right back. >> host: and we're back live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city. this is booktv on c-span 2. mr. davis come you say when it comes to your career, your writing career that she give a lot of credit to join davis. who is that? >
officials allow back in boston who had this quote, not exactly accurate but she said that women politicians speak softly and carry a big statistic. i don't really think they speak softly anymore, but there is a model of women who have had to come through the ranks against all odds with a focus more on accountability. when i was running for county attorney i would look at the records of janet napolitano as governor of arizona, kathleen sebelius in kansas because on their website, they showed what their goals were and what they got done. and i think you see that in some of the women come and actually some of the male senators as well that made it to this election but while the balance of power stay the same in washington, there was definitely a rejection of people have a rigid ideology. people want to see things get done and copper much. they did want to see people swinging at each other from opposite corners of the boxing ring. >> the sometimes generations about how women to manage things everything in businesses it women tend to be more consensual. we all are good at co-oping. is that your
at boston university. high school is an interesting question. it's where i started playing football. and it's hard to figure where on the spectrum it fits. we know youth is probably more dangerous than high school. we know that high school is a big part of our culture. i kind of want to go back, i have a lots of notes here to separate youth from kind of professional and then kind of where we're in the middle. because i think this discussion is really what is unique about football versus other sports and while we're having the discussion. a lot comes down to the adult game is not really separated from the youth game. in a meaningful way. like soccer there's no heading before a search age. no checking in ice hockey. baseball no curve ball. we don't do that football. it's the real game where head contact is not rare, and accidental. and so i think we have to kind of identify that as a big issue. but i think we have to look to in terms what we should be doing we actually can look up to the nfl and the nfl pa about steps they have made in the last two years to make the game safer. you look at th
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)